6 Steps to Creating your Personal Dress Code

children-602967_640Many moms have joined with Staples in celebrating this back-to-school-season as “the most wonderful time of the year.” 

Especially, the moms of students with dress codes. It may have been a challenge to hunt down the khakis or figure out sizes after a summer of growth, but  it’s all worth it once the morning routine starts and the  wardrobe choices are extremely simplified.

My kids have always had a dress code for school and of course they would tell you they did not like it, but honestly I think each of them appreciated that they didn’t have to struggle with options early in the morning. It’s natural for kids to complain that they can’t wear what they want, but when they arrived at school they can be sure that they will fit in with all their peers and their common frustration creates a bond between them. After awhile most them realize it is more fun to dress up occasionally than to have the pressure of creating an impressive outfit every day.

As a mom, I honestly think that dress code is brilliant. Part of the brilliance of keeping a “code” is that you can mix and match various pieces and come up with multiple outfits because they are all designed to go together. This is also why following your Img.ID guidelines is so affective; it is like following your own personal dress code.

  • CB vase Transparent-Bgrnd_Bouquet copyIf you are a Classic, then your code is “professional.”
  • If you are a Natural, then your code is “casual.”
  • If you are a Dramatic, then your code is “fashionable.”
  • If you are an Ingénue, then your code is “youthful.”
  • If you are a Romantic, then your code is “feminine.”
  • If you are a Gamine, then your code is “spunky.”

Your code makes shopping simple.  If each item in your closet “speaks” your code, then they will compliment and complete each other. Whereas if you have a closet full of a variety of styles, you may find yourself often frazzled as you try to put pieces together.  This is also why combination Img.IDs take a little more effort in creating a wardrobe that speaks your authentic style. For example, a professional top doesn’t easily compliment a youthful skirt, if you are a Classic/Ingenue you may want some coaching. For more on this, see my blogs on branding.

One important factor to any dress code is color. We all know that some color combinations fight with one another and should “never” be worn together. (Yet for a Gamine with a combination Img.ID this may be a great choice! But that’s a blog for another day.) This is why all school dress codes are simple colors.

As a color analysis, I think most schools should make some changes. Navy and Burgundy are strong and empowering colors, but they drain the color out of the face of anyone except the Winters. Unfortunately, I have no authority in the schools to make the suggestion of having four undertones of the colors they choose, but as an image coach I can assist you in making correct color choices for your own personal dress code. If every item in your wardrobe compliments the chemical make up of your natural coloring they will not only help you always look your best, but they will compliment each other making your choices each morning much more simplified.

It’s not just the school kids that like to express their individuality; we all do. The problem is, color has such a deep tie into our emotions that we often choose the colors we wear by the mood we are in. The good news is, though, that if we choose colors that compliment our hair and skin tones they will not only empower our mood, but they will influence the mood of those we are talking with.

So, how do you simplify you or your student’s wardrobe if there is no dress code? Create one. Here’s how:

  • First, learn your personal Img.ID (including your seasonal palette of colors).
  • Second, shop in stores that follow your code (above).
  • Third, pull out only items that are your size and are within your seasonal palette.
  • Fourth, assess that item: does it “say” your code?
  • Fifth, try on only–and (be brave!) ALL–items that meet these criteria.
  • Sixth, purchase completed outfits. If you find an item you love but cannot complete it, keep shopping until you do–even if that means bringing that item with you when you shop the next time. Keep it in the bag with the tags on and hold onto that receipt because if you cannot complete it, you will not wear it and should not waist it. (That’s the Natural side of me advising the practical.)

 

For more information on my image assessment workshops, parties or retreats, please visit http://catrinawelch.com/image-coaching/

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