Some Rules of Illusions

Confidence is freedom from self-consciousness and the joy of others-consciousness.

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For us women, that freedom is found more easily if we fell like we are lookin’ good, wouldn’t you agree?

Find your freedom by learning how to look your best everyday without thinking about it any more!

Ideally, you want your outfit to hang well on your figure without clinging to any bulges and for your hairstyle, make up and accessories to accentuate the style of beauty you are. (to learn more, click “Get  your Img.ID here” on the right of this site, or check it out in my book: Know Who You Are: Guidelines for your Personal Image Identity)

Your whole look, not just your clothing, should be considered part of your image. Everything about your beauty should be in balance, and consistent with who you are. If you have discovered the best wardrobe for you is straight and dramatic lines, but your hairstyle is round and full, you may find yourself frustrated with trying to put things together that you feel good in.

As a teaser for what is in the book, here are some of the general rules of disguising your figure flaws with some rules of illusions:

  • Dark lines are sliming, deepening
  • Solid, dark, unbroken colors are sliming
  • Lighter lines create the allusion of fullness
  • Solid, light, unbroken colors, especially if shinny or bright, add fullness.
  • Simple, vertical lines are slimming and create height but it can also add the allusion of width if it is drawn in the right place.
  • Many close vertical lines, however create width; as do many close, horizontal lines or shallow angled lines.
  • If the angle of the line is steep, however, it will give the area it is drawn on the allusion of more height
  • Horizontal lines will add width, and create the illusion of a shorter figure.
  • A single horizontal line however will create the illusion of more height if it is drawn high or low on the body, and not centered.

In general: any line that hides or disguises a figure challenge is a flattering line. If it draws attention to the challenge or flaw, it is a negative line.

 

Patterns and textures also create illusions:

  • Large patterns make a figure appear smaller
  • Small patterns make a figure appear larger
  • Large accessories dwarf a small figure (or face)
  • Small accessories are lost and out of place on a full figure (or face)
  • Contrasting color patterns add fullness
  • Soft, muted colors (in a pattern or not) reduce the figure size
  • Bulky, coarse fabrics add weight to a figure
  • Light, crisp, stiff fabrics that stand away from the body hide some imperfections, but can add the appearance of more weight
  • Shiny fabrics add fullness
  • Matted textures are good for full figures
  • Drappy fabrics are best for rounded figures
  • Crisp fabrics are best for straighter figures

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Catrina Welch is an image- and life-coach whose message is not as much “what not to wear” as it is, “Know Who You Are,” which is the title of her book of guidelines for your personal image identity. Catrina has also written a Bible study to help women overcome their image issues. It is titled Supreme MakeOver: a Rich and Refreshing Devotional Experience. Her other books include Footprints Through the Sand: a Consolidation of Life-altering stories about Loving and Loosing a Trisomy-18 Baby and Confident Beauty: Reflecting the One Who Made You with the Images in Your Mirror and Your Soul, which will be available soon.

If you are interested in getting these books or having Catrina come speak at your event, you can contact her at www.CatrinaWelch.com or on facebook.

 

 

 

About Catrina

Catrina Welch has been helping others with their image for more than 30 years. As a licensed cosmologist, certified image consultant and Biblical life-coach, she is well aware that image issues are far more difficult for some styles than they are for others. After her first husband left her while pregnant, she learned first hand that the greatest antidote to Confidence Conflicts is to know who you are, including your personal image identity. She developed a systematic way of doing image assessments for large groups, which she calls a “Supreme MakeOver.” Catrina is the author of five books, including “Confident Beauty: Reflecting the One Who Made You, with the Images in your Mirror and in your Soul.” She is the mother of four children. Catrina and Ron, her husband of twenty-five years, live on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. For more information about Supreme MakeOvers or having Catrina speak at your next event, email her at catrina@catrinawelch.com

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